Art to Enhance Learning

6 Nov
A Student's Creation of Cubist Art, from Joe A. Ross School in The Pas, Manitoba

A Student’s Creation of Cubist Art, from Joe A. Ross School in The Pas, Manitoba

When I work with students of any age, I draw comical figures on the board. A class that has seemed resistant to learning will immediately shift into openness. I believe this happens because the right brain offers a rest, a vacation, a happy excursion away from the over programmed left brain. I can literally feel the relief of visual learners—often a large portion of a classroom—when I bring in the visual art element. I explain to students that when I write, if I reach a writer’s block, all I need is to draw to release some new ideas.

Jane, Lisa, Becky, Jack, Mr. McLean, Nicholas, Mrs. McLean

Jane, Lisa, Becky, Jack, Mr. McLean, Nicholas, Mrs. McLean

I draw on the board in order to model drawing for students. An aspect of my novel for young people, The Beech Nut of Big Water Beach is that the main character, Munro McLean, is ridiculed in school for his advanced knowledge of art. In order for students to understand Munro—and to understand the art theme in the book—we Google famous artists and art movements—Picasso, Da Vinci, Reubens, Cubism, and more. Students embrace this increase in knowledge of art and of the theme of art in the novel. I was so delighted when I was explaining Cubism to students at Joe A. Ross School in The Pas, Manitoba, when a student handed me her visual comprehension of the idea, shown above.

Munro, The Beech Nut, Alison, Al, Mike, Dean

Munro, The Beech Nut, Alison, Al, Mike, Dean

As well, students draw the characters in order to underscore their understanding of the novel. I project or make a drawing of the characters that students can then use to create their own drawings. Of course, students are more or less skilled at drawing, so when I model how to draw, I help the less advanced artists. I stress that we all draw differently and at different speeds, and that we must respect our own progress. Practice improves artistic ability. Students at Joe A. Ross engaged wonderfully in the process of exploring the characters through drawing.

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Creative activities enhance learning, as all educators know. I was delighted to find that when teacher Myrna Ducharme taught The Beech Nut of Big Water Beach at Joe A. Ross School last year, she had students engage in watercolour painting in order to encourage them to experience the world of art so loved by the character Munro. Student paintings were beautifully done, and students’ understandings of Munro as an artist increased substantially.

Tomorrow, I will share some of the younger students activities….

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