Sharing a Tale of Transformation

9 Nov
My Illustrated All-Ages Fairytale, Tiktala

My Illustrated All-Ages Fairytale, Tiktala

Another highlight of my visit to Joe A. Ross School was that I was able to read and share my all-ages fairy tale, Tiktala, with students in the three Grade Five classrooms who were good listeners and kind and receptive as I read to them. I told students that Tiktala started from a dream and the creation of Tiktala involved a five year process from the beginning dream to the finished published book.

Opening Page in Tiktala with Beautiful Illustration by Laszlo Gal of Inuit Homes and Northern Lights

Opening Page in Tiktala with Beautiful Illustration by Laszlo Gal of Inuit Homes and Northern Lights

To acquaint my blog readers with Tiktala, as the story opens, the elders of the village have called a meeting because the people are forgetting the old ways. We learn there are many soapstone carvers who sell their work for high prices but who don’t care about the animal spirits who enter the stones. Tiktala, an Inuit girl, lets the group know that she wants to become a soapstone carver. She is not like her mother who believes in spirits and she is not like her father who has lost his belief in everything.

Tiktala Lets the Villagers Know She Wants to Become a Soapstone Carver

Tiktala Lets the Villagers Know She Wants to Become a Soapstone Carver

Tiktala has her own reasons for wanting to carve—to be famous and admired, to make money to buy things, and above all, to gain her depressed father’s attention. While some villagers think she is too young, Iguptak, the wisest woman of the village sends Tiktala on a spirit quest.

Little would Tiktala have imagined it to be possible but she is transformed into a seal. Another seal appears, Tulimak, who is supposed to take Tiktala on the journey north for summer fishing. We discover that Tulimak is angry and hates humans for what she has suffered. Without a way out, Tiktala and Tulimak make the challenging expedition north together. What transpires is that Tiktala goes on a life altering journey, undergoing the artists’ task of learning to care about what she wants to create.

As it turned out, at Joe A. Ross School, the students were captivated by the story, and the teachers decided to purchase a class set of Tiktala books and my Tiktala Teacher’s Guide (Available on my Teachers Pay Teachers site. Readers can press on my link to find it. Tiktala can be purchased too through popular booksellers such as Amazon and Chapters and McNally Robinson (online and otherwise))

Tiktala Teacher's Guide

Tiktala Teacher’s Guide

My Tiktala Teacher’s Guide is a rich resource that explores First Nations concepts such as the connection to nature, shamans, vision quests, humans’ connections to animals, and spirit guides. I was so delighted to know that Joe A. Ross teachers would bring students through this study. As well, the guide allows teachers to explore with students the many deep themes in Tiktala: the hero journey, the development of the artist, revenge and forgiveness, environmental awareness, parent/child relationships, transformation, and human creativity vs. destructiveness. A further joyful aspect of the guide is the in-depth exploration of Laszlo Gal’s illustrations, after which students create their own illustrated transformation tales.

In my next entry, I will share with readers an unexpected pleasure I received during my visit to Joe A. Ross school, as I learned about captivating art created by a local native artist…

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2 Responses to “Sharing a Tale of Transformation”

  1. Otto von Münchow November 26, 2013 at 3:50 pm #

    Sounds like you had a nice visit to Joe A. Ross school. And from what you tell about Tiktala it must be a very interesting and spellbinding story. Very imaginative. I also like the illustration by Lászlo Gál. Congratulations with the school deciding to purchase a class set of Tiktala books and your Tiktala Teacher’s Guide.

  2. shawmackinnon November 26, 2013 at 4:12 pm #

    Thank you, Otto! The creative process is mysterious. When I was three years into the writing process, friends would say “Are you still working on that?” I had to follow the dream. Then, I was in a bookstore and saw a book illustrated by Laszlo Gal. I thought “If I could choose one illustrator in the world for Tiktala, it would be this Laszlo Gal.” A year later, who did the accepting publisher choose to illustrate my book, but Laszlo Gal!

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