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Celebrating Native Artists’ Visions

12 May
"October" by Sydney Kirkness

“October” by Sydney Kirkness

In the image created for the month of October, Sydney Kirkness paints a sturdy lone bull elk against a scene rich with fall colours—a foreground of gold, salmon, orange, and rust with a sprinkling of falling leaves leading to the blue spruce and pine of the forest. In the latter part of the year, the life cycle enters maturity for which the elk is a fitting animal representative, the essence of noble strength and stamina that brings us far in life. Above the warm fall colours, Sydney paints the cool blues, suggestive of oncoming winter, emphasized by the black silhouettes of geese flying south for the winter.

"November" by Sydney Kirkess

“November” by Sydney Kirkess

For November, Sydney brings the viewer into oncoming winter with a cool palette, all shades of blue from the deep blue of the towering forest pine to the white-blue of the snowy landscape. The only warm colour is in the deer’s reddish winter coat and in tan tufts of grass about to be covered over in the driving snow. The scene seems to be just before the ice forms, the trees reflected in the last of the frosty open water. The deer, alert, caught in the moment, looks ready to head for the cover of the forest.

"December" by Sydney Kirkness

“December” by Sydney Kirkness

The last image, created by Sydney for December, shows an absence of animal life in the world of wintery slumber. Sydney paints the scene in the cool blues, as the blanket of snow covers the earth. The band of sky above the forest is a pastel purple, adding depth to the quiet scene. Life hibernates, as the year comes to a close. The circular form of the image reminds us that the seasons are cyclical and that the whole pattern will begin again.

Such are the wonderful images painted by Sydney Kirkness and Moses Bignell for the staff and generations of students of Joe A. Ross School in The Pas, Manitoba. During my Artist in the Schools visit, I was fortunate to pass by these paintings over the course of two weeks as I taught. I feel honoured to have had the chance to reflect on the fine work of these wise and talented native artists’ and to celebrate the gifts their paintings continue to bring to viewers.

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Creative Anti-Bullying Immersion

3 Nov
Pillars Representing the Stages of Human Life from Infancy to Old Age

Pillars Representing the Stages of Human Life from Infancy to Old Age

In my post yesterday, I wrote about how I visited Joe A. Ross School in The Pas, Manitoba, and the architecture of the building beautifully embodies concepts significant in Cree spirituality. In such a meaningful setting, I was privileged to teach enthusiastic students from Grades One to Six.

Vibrant Sky and School

Vibrant Sky and School

A highlight of my visit was that students in the three Grade Six classes began my novel, The Beech Nut of Big Water Beach, and the accompanying Novel Study and Anti-Bullying Guide, with the help of three skillful teachers, Crystal Ross, Myrna Ducharme, and Michelle Edwards. Together, over the two weeks we engaged in a variety of activities. We read the first five chapters which immediately engaged students as every kid has experienced the bullying scenario, whether as bully, bullied, or bystander, a major theme in the novel. A big plus is that the book is humorous, which draws in more young readers, and there is social intrigue and romance, always captivating themes.

Teacher Myrna Ducharme Reads The Beech Nut of Big Water Beach to the Class

Teacher Myrna Ducharme Reads The Beech Nut of Big Water Beach to the Class

More Students Involved in  the Reading and Listening Process

More Students Involved in the Reading and Listening Process

The World of Big Water Beach Comes to Life in the Mind's of Students

The World of Big Water Beach Comes to Life in the Minds of Students

The following synopsis will give blog readers an idea of what these Joe A. Ross students read in these chapters. The first chapter of the novel sets the stage for the bullying theme as we discover that the main character, Munro McLean, has been bullied all through Grades Five and Six, and that he has been called a nerd, dork, and geek, and has been thrown around, ridiculed and generally made miserable at school.

Teacher Crystal Ross and Students Immersed in Novel

Teacher Crystal Ross and Students Immersed in Novel

In the next chapter, we discover that Munro is popular at Big Water Beach, a great relief, but in order to stay popular, he has to avoid Cassandra Beech, an elderly woman who is a hermit and an artist, nicknamed The Beech Nut of Big Water Beach, and her grandniece Alison, who have decided they want Munro to create art with them.

Attentive Readers

Attentive Readers

In the following chapters, as Munro’s typical beach life unfolds, with swimming lessons, a game of Truth or Dare, a dog show and more, we are introduced to the fun-loving kids of Munro’s peer group, who we discover have a dark side, in that they begin to pick on Alison, the outsider. Munro, on the other hand, starts to secretly hang out with the Beech Nut and Alison to make art, and tension deepens and high antics increase as Munro madly tries to keep his life as an artist with the Beech Nut and Alison separate from his life within his peer group.

The Plot Thickens

The Plot Thickens

An activity that the teachers and I used was to allow students to draw ten pivotal characters in the novel. When students draw and visualize the characters, they engage more with them and can see them in their minds’ eyes more easily. Some students are visual learners who relate strongly to having the chance to draw.

Character Images are Projected and Students Immerse in Drawing

Character Images are Projected and Students Immerse in Drawing

Concentrating on Artwork

Concentrating on Artwork

Teacher Michelle Edwards Joins Students in Art Activity

Teacher Michelle Edwards Joins Students in Art Activity

In my next entry, I invite you to come with me to my lodgings during this Northern visit, a little cottage on the shores of the third clearest cleanest lake in the world, Clear Water Lake….

Autumn at Lake of the Woods

1 Nov
Leaves Like Red Petals

Leaves Like Red Petals

Celebrating PACER National Bullying Prevention Center

28 Apr

As a new feature of my blog, I will gradually add sites that highlight anti-bullying resources. My husband, Brian MacKinnon, is an anti-poverty activist who has been the Founder and Director of the Y-Not? Anti-Poverty Program for the past twelve years—a program that has enhanced the health and hope of inner city, underprivileged kids by providing youth with over 12,000 memberships to the YMCA/YWCA recreation facility.

As an anti-poverty activist and retired inner city English teacher, Brian is committed to the anti-bullying agenda; in a 2012 Winnipeg Free Press article, he noted reference to PACER, a National Bullying Prevention Center in the U.S.A., an organization with much to offer in anti-bullying consciousness-raising. Their belief is that: The End of Bullying Begins with You. Their hopeful message is that individuals can bring about change.

We can all make a difference in creating a beautiful peaceful world.

We can all make a difference in creating a beautiful peaceful world.

When you peruse PACER’S website, you find a valuable collection of anti-bullying tools: videos, stories, resources (bookmarks, hand-outs, classroom toolkits, a school event planning kit, and more), petitions, news, and sites for kids/teens. As well, a newsletter keeps readers up to date on the activities in October, the month chosen in the U.S.A. for a concerted focus on the anti-bullying agenda.

PACER is an inclusive organization that welcomes others to post their anti-bullying programs in the Champions section on their site, which I have chosen to do. Each Champion entry represents individuals or groups who make concerted efforts to bring focus to the pervasive human activity of bullying. The more we shine light on our negative behavior and make efforts to understand, prevent, and alter our very human propensity for bullying, the more we can hope to create a safe, peaceful, creative world.